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John | 10th Jan 2012, 23:32 PM | HKDSE英文科練習 | (4586 Reads)
以文學名著出幾題較深的reading題目。「較深」指:
1.          passage較長;
2.          句子較深;
3.          答題時要寫的東西較多。

The campaign brought honours and promotion to many, but for me it had nothing but misfortune and disaster. I was removed from my brigade and attached to the Berkshires, with whom I served at the fatal battle of Maiwand. There I was struck on the shoulder by a Jezail bullet, which shattered the bone and grazed the subclavian artery. I should have fallen into the hands of the murderous Ghazis had it not been for the devotion and courage shown by Murray, my orderly, who threw me across a pack-horse, and succeeded in bringing me safely to the British lines.

Worn with pain, and weak from the prolonged hardships which I had undergone, I was removed, with a great train of wounded sufferers, to the base hospital at Peshawar. Here I rallied, and had already improved so far as to be able to walk about the wards, and even to bask a little upon the verandah, when I was struck down by enteric fever, that curse of our Indian possessions. For months my life was despaired of, and when at last I came to myself and became convalescent, I was so weak and emaciated that a medical board determined that not a day should be lost in sending me back to England. I was dispatched, accordingly, in the troopship "Orontes," and landed a month later on Portsmouth jetty, with my health irretrievably ruined, but with permission from a paternal government to spend the next nine months in attempting to improve it.

I had neither kith nor kin in England, and was therefore as free as air -- or as free as an income of eleven shillings and sixpence a day will permit a man to be. Under such circumstances, I naturally gravitated to London, that great cesspool into which all the loungers and idlers of the Empire are irresistibly drained. There I stayed for some time at a private hotel in the Strand, leading a comfortless, meaningless existence, and spending such money as I had, considerably more freely than I ought. So alarming did the state of my finances become, that I soon realized that I must either leave the metropolis and rusticate somewhere in the country, or that I must make a complete alteration in my style of living. Choosing the latter alternative, I began by making up my mind to leave the hotel, and to take up my quarters in some less pretentious and less expensive domicile.

On the very day that I had come to this conclusion, I was standing at the Criterion Bar, when some one tapped me on the shoulder, and turning round I recognized young Stamford, who had been a dresser under me at Barts. The sight of a friendly face in the great wilderness of London is a pleasant thing indeed to a lonely man. In old days Stamford had never been a particular crony of mine, but now I hailed him with enthusiasm, and he, in his turn, appeared to be delighted to see me. In the exuberance of my joy, I asked him to lunch with me at the Holborn, and we started off together in a hansom.

"Whatever have you been doing with yourself, Watson?" he asked in undisguised wonder, as we rattled through the crowded London streets. "You are as thin as a lath and as brown as a nut."

I gave him a short sketch of my adventures, and had hardly concluded it by the time that we reached our destination.

"Poor devil!" he said, commiseratingly, after he had listened to my misfortunes. "What are you up to now?"

"Looking for lodgings." {3} I answered. "Trying to solve the problem as to whether it is possible to get comfortable rooms at a reasonable price."

"That's a strange thing," remarked my companion; "you are the second man to-day that has used that expression to me."

"And who was the first?" I asked.

"A fellow who is working at the chemical laboratory up at the hospital. He was bemoaning himself this morning because he could not get someone to go halves with him in some nice rooms which he had found, and which were too much for his purse."

"By Jove!" I cried, "if he really wants someone to share the rooms and the expense, I am the very man for him. I should prefer having a partner to being alone."

Young Stamford looked rather strangely at me over his wine-glass. "You don't know Sherlock Holmes yet," he said; "perhaps you would not care for him as a constant companion."

"Why, what is there against him?"

"Oh, I didn't say there was anything against him. He is a little queer in his ideas -- an enthusiast in some branches of science. As far as I know he is a decent fellow enough."

"A medical student, I suppose?" said I.

"No -- I have no idea what he intends to go in for. I believe he is well up in anatomy, and he is a first-class chemist; but, as far as I know, he has never taken out any systematic medical classes. His studies are very desultory and eccentric, but he has amassed a lot of out-of-the way knowledge which would astonish his professors."

Questions

1.          The author was not captured by the Ghazis because __________________________________________________________

2.          The author was sent back to England because

A.      The battle of Maiwand was fatal.

B.      He suffered from enteric fever.

C.      There were too many wounded soldiers in the hospital at Peshawar.

D.     He was struck on the shoulder by a bullet.

3.          The author was sent back to England

A.      by land.

B.      by sea.

C.      by air.

D.     multi-modal transport.

4.          When the author could no longer afford to stay at the private hotel in the Strand, the two choices before him were either to ___________________________ or to ___________________________.

5.          Why did the author ask Stamford to lunch with him?

__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

6.          What was the reaction of Stamford after hearing the author’s adventures?

__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

7.          According to the passage, which two persons were looking for a flat?

____________________________________

8.          What did Stamford mean when he said “You don’t know Michael Swan yet, perhaps you would not care for him as a constant companion.”

__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

9.          What did Stamford say about Michael Swan?

___________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ 

Answer Key

1.          The author was not captured by the Ghazis because Murray, his orderly, saved him (by bringing him back to the British lines on a packhorse).

2.          The author was sent back to England because

A.      The battle of Maiwand was fatal.

B.      He suffered from enteric fever.

C.      There were too many wounded soldiers in the hospital at Peshawar.

D.     He was struck on the shoulder by a bullet.

3.          The author was sent back to England

A.      by land.

B.      by sea. cluethe troopship Orontes)Orontes是船的名稱,起碼你應該認出ship這個字。)

C.      by air.

D.     multi-modal transport.

4.          When the author could no longer afford to stay at the private hotel in the Strand, the two choices before him were either to leave London and rusticate somewhere in the country or to alter/change his living style/style of living. (原文是:I must either leave the metropolis and rusticate somewhere in the country(暫時在鄉間定居), or that I must make a complete alteration in my style of living. 留意:(1)因為題目有to,所以原文的that不能抄;(2) metropolis要改為LondonLondon這個字曾在前文出現;my要改為his,其他的可以抄。

5.          Why did the author ask Stamford to lunch with him?

It was because the author felt lonely in London, and Stamford also seemed delighted to see him.(原文是:The sight of a friendly face in the great wilderness of London is a pleasant thing indeed to a lonely man. In old days Stamford had never been a particular crony of mine, but now I hailed him with enthusiasm, and he, in his turn, appeared to be delighted to see me. In the exuberance of my joy, I asked him to lunch with me at the Holborn即是說,原因有兩個,一則作者lonely,二則Stamford見到作者也表現得很開心,大家都開心,作者便提出齊齊吃lunch。)

6.          What was the reaction of Stamford after hearing the author’s adventures?

He seemed to feel sympathetic about what the author had gone through. (這題主要考你懂不懂commiseratingly這個字,解作「同情地」。)

7.          According to the passage, which two persons were looking for a flat?

The author and Michael Swan.

8.          What did Stamford mean when he said “You don’t know Michael Swan yet, perhaps you would not care for him as a constant companion.”

He meant that the author might not like to share a room and the expense with Michael Swan. (這題考兩點。第一,追溯到前文share the rooms and expense的能力。第二,是否懂得解you would not care for。原文先寫作者說:if he really wants someone to share the rooms and the expense, I am the very man for him…然後隔了些字再寫Stamfordperhaps you would not care for him as a constant companion,意指你不會很着意去將他當作同伴,是「你不會喜歡」的婉轉表達。)

9.          What did Stamford say about Michael Swan?

Michael Swan was a decent man, a science enthusiast with queer ideas/who was a little queer in ideas.  He was good at anatomy and chemistry.  He never taken/attended any systematic medical classes.  He pursued desultory and eccentric studies but had lots of out-of-the-way/unusual knowledge (which would astonish his professors). (這條考rewriting。原文:"Oh, I didn't say there was anything against him. He is a little queer in his ideas -- an enthusiast in some branches of science. As far as I know he is a decent fellow enough." "A medical student, I suppose?" said I. "No -- I have no idea what he intends to go in for. I believe he is well up in anatomy, and he is a first-class chemist; but, as far as I know, he has never taken out any systematic medical classes. His studies are very desultory and eccentric, but he has amassed a lot of out-of-the way knowledge which would astonish his professors." 

Passage(注明和答案有關的部分)

The campaign brought honours and promotion to many, but for me it had nothing but misfortune and disaster. I was removed from my brigade and attached to the Berkshires, with whom I served at the fatal battle of Maiwand. There I was struck on the shoulder by a Jezail bullet, which shattered the bone and grazed the subclavian artery. I should have fallen into the hands of the murderous Ghazis had it not been for the devotion and courage shown by Murray, my orderly(勤務兵), who threw me across a pack-horse, and succeeded in bringing me safely to the British lines.Q1的答案)

Worn with pain, and weak from the prolonged hardships which I had undergone, I was removed, with a great train of wounded sufferers, to the base hospital at Peshawar. Here I rallied, and had already improved so far as to be able to walk about the wards, and even to bask a little upon the verandah, when I was struck down by enteric fever, that curse of our Indian possessions. For months my life was despaired of, and when at last I came to myself and became convalescent, I was so weak and emaciated that a medical board determined that not a day should be lost in sending me back to EnglandQ2的答案). I was dispatched, accordingly, in the troopship "Orontes,"Q3的答案)and landed a month later on Portsmouth jetty, with my health irretrievably ruined, but with permission from a paternal government to spend the next nine months in attempting to improve it.

I had neither kith nor kin in England, and was therefore as free as air -- or as free as an income of eleven shillings and sixpence a day will permit a man to be. Under such circumstances, I naturally gravitated to London, that great cesspool into which all the loungers and idlers of the Empire are irresistibly drained. There I stayed for some time at a private hotel in the Strand, leading a comfortless, meaningless existence, and spending such money as I had, considerably more freely than I ought. So alarming did the state of my finances become, that I soon realized that I must either leave the metropolis and rusticate somewhere in the country(暫時在鄉間定居), or that I must make a complete alteration in my style of livingQ4的答案). Choosing the latter alternative, I began by making up my mind to leave the hotel, and to take up my quarters in some less pretentious and less expensive domicile.

On the very day that I had come to this conclusion, I was standing at the Criterion Bar, when some one tapped me on the shoulder, and turning round I recognized young Stamford, who had been a dresser under me at Barts. The sight of a friendly face in the great wilderness of London is a pleasant thing indeed to a lonely man. In old days Stamford had never been a particular crony of mine, but now I hailed him with enthusiasm, and he, in his turn, appeared to be delighted to see me. In the exuberance of my joy, I asked him to lunch with me at the HolbornQ5的答案), and we started off together in a hansom.

"Whatever have you been doing with yourself, Watson?" he asked in undisguised wonder, as we rattled through the crowded London streets. "You are as thin as a lath and as brown as a nut."

I gave him a short sketch of my adventures, and had hardly concluded it by the time that we reached our destination.

"Poor devil!" he said, commiseratinglyQ6的答案), after he had listened to my misfortunes. "What are you up to now?"

"Looking for lodgings." {3} I answered. "Trying to solve the problem as to whether it is possible to get comfortable rooms at a reasonable price."  

"That's a strange thing," remarked my companion; "you are the second man to-day that has used that expression to me." Q7的答案第一個clue

"And who was the first?" I asked.

"A fellow who is working at the chemical laboratory up at the hospital. He was bemoaning himself this morning because he could not get someone to go halves with him in some nice rooms which he had found, and which were too much for his purse."

"By Jove!" I cried, "if he really wants someone to share the rooms and the expense, I am the very man for him. I should prefer having a partner to being alone."

Young Stamford looked rather strangely at me over his wine-glass. "You don't know Sherlock Holmes Q7的答案第二個clueyet," he said; "perhaps you would not care for him as a constant companion." Q8的答案,)

"Why, what is there against him?"

"Oh, I didn't say there was anything against him. He is a little queer in his ideas -- an enthusiast in some branches of science. As far as I know he is a decent fellow enough."

"A medical student, I suppose?" said I.

"No -- I have no idea what he intends to go in for. I believe he is well up in anatomy, and he is a first-class chemist; but, as far as I know, he has never taken out any systematic medical classes. His studies are very desultory and eccentric, but he has amassed a lot of out-of-the way knowledge which would astonish his professors." Q9的答案)

Adapted from Sherlock Holmes(我將Sherlock Holmes的名字改為Michael Swan 

Picture

 

我完全落後於形勢,根本不明白反D&G運動為何如此洶湧(我相信這個運動也是對的,有其洶湧的道理,只是我自己沒有投入感也沒有興趣).我只是想,如果社民連或人民力量或任何像朱海迪先生等為公義卻被政治檢控拉進差館的人,當有人發短迅請求前赴支援後,有這樣多人去圍警署就好了,香港就有真民主了.無可否認,我不太明白在我身邊的人和不在我身邊的人的心。

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